Internet

On July 1, 2017, an important grace period terminated for Canada’s Anti-Spam Law (CASL), which initially took effect on July 1, 2014. The beginning of this month marked the end of the two-year grace period for entities to rely on “implied consent” as a basis for sending commercial electronic messages to potential customers, donors, clients or the like. Going forward, entities will need to obtain express consent from all email recipients, or expunge “stale” contacts to avoid potential violations of CASL. A private right of action against offenders that was also set to become available on July 1, 2017 has been put on hold indefinitely subject to Canadian government review. (more…)

The cost of filing and maintaining federal trademark registrations with the USPTO just got lower.  On January 17, 2015, the PTO announced a $50 per class reduction in initial filing fees for trademark applications filed under the “TEAS Plus” program, while simultaneously introducing a new “TEAS Reduced Fee” (a.k.a. TEAS RF) program at the former TEAS Plus rate, but with less strict filing requirements. (more…)

The process of creating “link relationships” between documents and personal profiles used by Facebook®, LinkedIn®, and other social media platforms came under fire in October 2012 via a patent infringement suit filed by technology company Bascom Research, LLC.  Facebook®, LinkedIn®, and three other network software companies were named as defendants in that suit.  More than two years later, and in the wake of the seismic ruling issued by the U.S. Supreme Court in Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank Int’l, Bascom’s challenge came to an unsuccessful end when the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California determined that Bascom’s patents for the linking technology were invalid as being drawn to abstract ideas. (more…)

On September 25, 2014, the Internet Corporation for the Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) granted the application of fTLD Registry Services (FRS) to operate a new Top Level Domain (TLD) exclusively for the banking industry: .bank. When general registration for the new TLD opens next year, banks and other members of the banking community will be able to operate through custom websites such as Local.bank, as opposed to the traditional LocalBank.com. To avoid the internet land rush for .bank extensions expected during the general registration window, banks with federally registered trademarks can get a 30-day head start towards TheirTrademark.bank by applying (and paying) for a spot on ICANN’s Trademark Clearinghouse registry. (more…)

Mathmatical algorithms are unpatentable. Software is a collection of algorithms expressed in machine code. Under current law, only software that involves a specific machine or physical result. The U.S. Supreme Court accepted cert in a case,  Alice Corporation Pty. Ltd. v. CLS Bank International (docket 13-298), involving financial software to mitigate risk in settlement transactions. The trial court decided the software is unpatentable because it merely uses “the abstract idea of employing an intermediary to facilitate simultaneous exchange of obligations”. the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit split on the decision, teeing it up for the Supreme Court.

Timothy Lee of the Washington Post points out that if the Supreme Court broadly invalidates the software patents, it would allieviate the nuisance suits by ‘non-producing entities’ or ‘trolls’, since most involve software. Would it discourage Congress from its present mission to identify a legislative solution to the troll problem? (more…)

A New York court convicted the “Cannibal Cop” trial in for conspiracy to kidnap, murder and eat women for pleasure based on postings made by the defendant on darkfetish.net. The defendant intends to appeal. The question on appeal boils down to whether the defendant’s online fantasy role play provided the mens rea (criminal intent) to conspire to commit murder. The line of judicial opinions concerning liability for deaths or injuries allegedly caused by violent media stretches back to 1950’s era censorship laws finding such laws are unconstitutional as they place a prior restraint on speech. In today’s user generated content and gamification of nearly everything, when doe role-playing cross the line to real-life crime? (more…)

Keeping your Facebook images private is a confounding problem. Ask Mark Zuckerberg’s sister Randi who couldn’t make sense of  FB’s privacy settings. Kashmir Hill, a privacy commentator at Forbes posted a funny analysis of the Zuckerberg predicament and easy to follow directions on how to adjust your settings to keep family photos more private. The settings are easy once you know where to look. User posting behavior sometimes doesn’t match with User privacy concerns.

Regarding content posted online as public is best– no matter what the privacy policy says.  Social media and other interactive businesses struggle  to keep their policies (and practices) current and reflective of how technology actually uses data to provide services online. Users who follow the steps in Kashmir Hill’s article and thinking before posting private content will have fewer social media privacy concerns.

FORCE's Pink Loves Consent

FORCE's Pink Loves Consent

A group of performance artists from Baltimore known as “FORCE: Upsetting Rape Culture” took advantage of a much anticipated media event to bring attention to the importance of consensual sex. The VS All Access Victoria’s Secret fashion show is an such an event, gluing billions of eyeballs to its prime time telecast.

For FORCE, the VS All Access television event was the perfect opportunity to launch its own fashion campaign, Pink Loves Consent, by spoofing Victoria’s Secret’s PINK brand. (more…)

Facebook gets a new groove: proposed updates to privacy and use policies

I guess we of Facebook Nation no longer “think” as one.  Last week Facebook announced proposed changes to its Data Use Policy (explains collection and use of data) and Statement of Rights and Responsibilities (terms of use).

As of November 28, Facebook will be able to change its policies with seven days notice to users. No more voting. In the past, voting on changes allowed some users to flood the system and obscure other user’s input. Will the proposed changes offer more transparency or enhance user’s experience?

The Data Use Policy is slowly becoming less opaque but still obscures some collection methods. For example, the Data Use policy does not explain how the Facebook “Like” button on third party sites may collect about our activities on each website we visit after “liking” a site and then share data with affiliates who serve targeted ads elsewhere.

Will the proposed changes affect businesses and marketeers using Facebook for corporate events, product launches and brand communications?  While the proposed changes do not seem to affect developer and marketing activity, empowering consumers with privacy settings could curb the digital love.

Everything needed to “understand” Facebook’s new moves is here.

Websites should consider treating children as an attractive nuisance. Even consider putting up fences to keep them out. 

The FTC is monitoring many websites that attract children (even unintentionally) for COPPA violations. The Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, COPPA, requires websites to  obtain verifiable parental consent before collecting personal information from kids under age 13.  Sites that are “directed” to such children must also disclose to parents what it collects about their children, how it uses the information and what it discloses to third parties. If the websites do not comply with COPPA the Federal Trade Commission may investigate, and impose fines and consent orders to curb websites’ tracking of children under 13.

Many website policies include a disclaimer that the website is “NOT directed” to children under age 13 and prohibit or limit access by children under 13 only with direct parental supervision.  Unfortunately, these policies will not limit the liability of a website operator if it knows kids under 13 are providing personal information to its website.  Then, the website is likely to be considered to be directed to such children.  If a website operator knows that kids are attracted to its website, then the website must comply with COPPA as if it the website is intentionally directed to children under 13.

Artist Arena manages fan sites for Justin Bieber, Rhiannon and Selena Gomez (among others)  together collected personal information from more than 25,000 children under the age of 13 without seeking verifiable parental consent.  Artist Arena’s fansites were intentionally directed to ‘tweens as the target audience of the celebrities featured on its fan sites and had COPPA policies, but failed to actually notify the parents and obtain their permission before collecting info from their children.  Artist Arena settled with the FTC, agreeing to pay a cool million dollars, enter into a consent decree against future  COPPA violations, and destroy all data it unlawfully collected from children.

The take-away?

Kids are adept at learning new technology and have unfettered access to smartphones, tablets and desktop computers.  So, it goes without saying that many registration schemes aimed at preventing kids from accessing an attractive website are quickly overcome.  A policy prohibiting use by children is definitely not sufficient. Operators of interactive websites (sites with blogs, forums, comment and sharing features) can’t ignore kids under 13 who are using the site .  Their data stream will likely “rat them (and the operator) out.”  With notice of kids, the operator must either block access or adopt a COPPA policy and enforce it. Get the COPPA FAQ’s  here.

As for Beiberfever.com? Users who admit to being age 13 or younger are persistently blocked from registering:

We are sorry, but you can not register at this time.

Hat/Tip to Sharon Snyder for sending me this Washington Post article about Artist Arena’s woes.