To understanding the copyright protections of pre-1972 sound recordings you have to Keep on Truckin’ with Hot Tuna and the sounds of the 60s

Keep on truckin' (creative commons with attribution to frankieleon)

Keep on Truckin’ (creative commons with attribution to frankieleon)

Do music streaming services need to pay royalties to play classic rock? It’s actually an open question. Some services have refused to pay performance royalties for all pre-1972 recordings. For many years, a false rumor persisted that because pre-1972 recordings are not protected by federal copyright law, they are not protected at all, and one need not pay royalties to use such recordings. To understand why that rumor is false, one needs to understand something about the history of legal protection for sound recordings in the U.S.

Prior to 1972, the Copyright Act of 1909 protected songwriters, but did not accord copyright to sound recordings on the federal level, and instead permitted each state to maintain its own common law of copyright. In 1972, Congress amended the 1909 Act to create an exclusive right for sound recordings produced after February 15, 1972. 17 U.S.C. Sec. 5(n) (1909 Copyright Act (Rev’d to 1973)). (more…)