2018

Game, Set, Match – Federer v. Nike and the RF Logo

Roger Federer is one of the most famous athletes of all time. He currently has won more majors than any male tennis player in the “Open Era,” and he is admired all over the world, not only for his excellence on the court but also for his humble attitude and family man persona off the court. Also, his initials are RF. Ordinarily this would be a banal detail if it weren’t for the fact that sportswear giant Nike currently owns the rights to a stylized version of Federer’s initials: the RF logo. In March 2018, Roger Federer and Nike’s 21-year relationship ended, and in June 2018, Federer entered into a $300 million deal with Uniqlo, a Japanese clothing company. Although Nike no longer has a clothing contract with Federer, Nike still owns the trademark registration in the iconic stylized RF logo in various registries across the world in classes of use covering clothing and footwear. (more…)

#Hashtag #Valuable Asset

As the explosion in popularity of various social media outlets continues, new norms are increasingly clear: once-descriptive social media hashtags and Twitter handles are now valuable assets that we associate with specific parties. Businesses, in particular, should have social media account usernames and hashtags cleared before using them in marketing and advertising their goods or services. (more…)

The Value of ZERO – Expanding the Doctrine of Generic Trademarks

A “generic” term for a general class of products or services cannot be used as a trademark or service mark for the goods or services in those class(es), because the function of a trademark (or service mark) is to identify and distinguish the goods or services of one seller from those sold by all others. Terms such as “apple” cannot serve as trademarks for goods comprising the edible fruits of the apple tree, but other terms that were once valid trademarks, capable of identifying a single purveyor of certain goods or services, have also fallen victim to “genericide” and lost their trademark significance. Some are now so commonly used that the consuming public may not even recognize that these terms were once considered exclusive trademarks of individual companies, such as escalator, linoleum, thermos, and trampoline. (more…)